Sunday, August 31, 2014

August 31: Trail Mix Day

image from elkspringresort.com

Consider these ingredients in allowing kids to make their own trail mix.


Trail Mix Day

Materials:

  • Raisins
  • Peanuts *
  • Other nuts *
  • Cheerios or other similar cereals
  • Chex mix
  • Puffed rice cereal
  • Pretzels
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Dried fruit
  • Chocolate chips
  • M&M’s
  • Mini-marshmallows
  • Butterscotch chips
  • Cheese bits
  • Goldfish crackers
  • Small paper cups
  • spoons

Directions:

  1. * Be aware of children’s allergies. It may be necessary to omit nuts from the list.
  2. Children can mix ingredients of their choosing to make individual trail mixes.
  3. For the best possible mix, kids should put a spoonful of each desired ingredient in their cups at a time.
  4. Stir!
  5. If you plan to be in the heat, omit items like chocolate chips, marshmallows, and butterscotch chips.

Source(s): 100 Cooking Activities for Kids


Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Saturday, August 30, 2014

August 30: Toasted Marshmallow Day

image from whatscookingamerica.net

Well, what else do you do for Toasted Marshmallow Day?


S’mores

Materials:

  • Graham crackers
  • Large marshmallows
  • Chocolate bars
  • Sandwich cookies
  • Mint cookies
  • Miniature marshmallows
  • Chocolate chips
  • Foil

Directions:

  1. The most common s’more is the classic combination of a marshmallow roasted over a campfire and then sandwiched between two graham crackers and a slice of chocolate. However, consider these alternatives as well:
  2. Instead of graham crackers and a chocolate bar, put marshmallow between two sides of a sandwich cookie.
  3. For another interesting flavor, try putting the marshmallow on a mint cookie.
  4. Make mini-s’mores with miniature marshmallows, chocolate chips, and broken pieces of graham cracker. Wrap everything in foil and set on campfire coals - but not long!
  5. Finally, brainstorm how you can make s’mores indoors. Can you make them in a microwave or on the stove? Can you make them with candles?

Source(s): 100 Cooking Activities for Kids


Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Friday, August 29, 2014

August 29: First Scout camp opened (1934)

image from adventuretravelcamp.com

Celebrate this big day with some camping activities!


Camping

Bring in various props to allow the kids to pretend they are camping. Consider:

  • Tents
  • Sleeping bags
  • A homemade campfire (with paper towel tubes as logs and tissue paper for flames)
  • A backpack packed with camping necessities
Possible activities include:
  • Mapping and orienteering with maps and compasses
  • Tape recording nature sounds
  • Fishing with magnets on sticks to pick up “fish” made out of paper and paper clips
  • Making first aid kits

Source(s): 100 Nature Activities for Kids card set (activities J1-J8).


Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Thursday, August 28, 2014

August 28: “I Have a Dream” Speech

image from farhanafadzil.wordpress.com

The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. gave his famous “I Have a Dream” speech on August 28, 1963.


I Have a Dream

Materials:

  • computer access

Directions:

  1. This activity is targeted toward older elementary school children.
  2. Let kids watch the video in the link below (or just listen to the audio).
  3. What is their reaction? Do they know who Martin Luther King, Jr. was? Do they know why he was important? What was so important about this speech?
  4. Because this runs more than 17 minutes, consider playing just a snipet of the speech or break it in chunks and have kids discuss it.
  5. Even without knowing the historical context of the speech and why it was significant, kids can analyze why King was a good speaker. What does he do to get the audience excited? What words and phrases does he emphasize? How does he use his voice? His face? His body language?
  6. For more information and activities regarding King, check out kaboose.com.

”I Have a Dream” speech


Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

August 27: Banana Lovers’ Day

image from food.com

Sharp followers of this blog will note that Banana Split Day was also celebrated in the last week. Maybe someone overdid it on their banana order and came up with Banana Lovers’ Day just two days later to get read of extras! In any event, here’s another fun banana snack:


Banana Caterpillar

Materials:

  • Bananas
  • Peanut butter
  • Grapes
  • Chow mien noodles
  • Knife
  • Plates

Directions:

  1. Peel a banana and slice it lengthwise.
  2. Use peanut butter to attach chow mien noodles to banana to form legs.
  3. Use peanut butter to attach grape to one end of banana to make the head.
  4. Gently poke two noodles into grape to form a head with antennae.

Source(s): familycorner.com, adapted for the Toolbox Training book 100 Cooking Activities for Kids. Also consider even more banana-oriented activities in that book: B5, C3, D5, and I9.


Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

August 26: Make Your Own Luck Day

image from quick-good-fortune.com

See what kids know about superstitions and the beliefs that they will bring good or bad luck.


Superstitions

Materials:

  • None

Directions:

  1. Ask kids what a superstition is. Wikipedia defines it as “a belief in a non-physical (i.e. supernatural) causality: that one event causes another without any physical process linking the two events”.
  2. Ask for examples of superstitions.
  3. Specifically ask what they can think of as symbols of good luck and bad luck.
  4. Why not see what kids know about superstitions? They can take a quiz at the National Geographic kids’ page.
  5. Check out corsinet.com for lots of superstitions.
  6. Falkor.org also details superstitions and offers explanations of how they came about.

Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Monday, August 25, 2014

August 25: Banana Split Day

image from icecreamjournal.turkeyhill.com

Let the kids make their own banana splits!


Banana Splits

Materials:

  • Bananas
  • Ice cream
  • Ice cream scoop
  • Ice cream sauces/syrups
  • Nuts (check first regarding kids’ allergies)
  • Sprinkles
  • Cherries
  • Spoons
  • Bowls or other containers

Directions:

  1. There’s really nothing to it. Just provide the kids with the ingredients and let them create their own banana splits.
  2. You can also have kids brainstorm some unusual toppings for the banana splits.
  3. You may need to have rules about how much kids can have of various ingredients (limit of how many scoops of ice cream, etc.). Otherwise they may get outrageous with their portions!

Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Sunday, August 24, 2014

August 24: Golf Month

image from jasonbowmangolf.com

To celebrate golf month, let the kids set up their own mini-golf course.


Mini-Golf

Materials:

  • Real or plastic golf balls
  • Golf clubs (real, plastic, or homemade)
  • Recyclable food containers such as cereal and oatmeal boxes, milk jugs, yogurt cups, two-liter bottles, gift wrap tubes, etc.

Directions:

  1. Use the recyclable materials to design the mini-golf course.
  2. Encourage kids to map it out before hand.
  3. Kids should test out the course before actual play.
  4. Once play starts, remind kids that this is a mini-golf course and they don’t need to swing the golf clubs hard!
  5. You may wish to use plastic balls for safety. However, using real golf balls and clubs allows children access to real materials.
  6. Make it a rule that children should not stand behind another player when someone is putting.
Variations:
  1. When setting up the course, you might have small groups of 1-4 kids be responsible for setting up each hole.
  2. It certainly isn’t necessary to buy golf clubs. Get the kids to brainstorm what you have on hand that can be used as clubs or how they can make their own.
  3. How is the game changed with different sized balls?

Source(s): 100 Game Activities for Kids


Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Saturday, August 23, 2014

August 23: Ride the Wind Day

image from kiteparadise.shopfactory.com


Kites

Materials:

  • Grocery bag (one per person)
  • Strong string
  • Scissors
  • Hole punch
  • Paper ring reinforcements (the kind you use on paper in binders) or masking tape
  • Glue
  • Paint
  • Crayons, markers, pencil crayons
  • Paper streamers or crepe paper
  • Found objects (bits of paper, glitter, buttons), nothing too heavy

Directions:

  1. Punch a hole in each of the four corners of the bag.
  2. Add ring reinforcements to the holes or put a small piece of masking tape over the hole and poke through with a pencil.
  3. Cut two pieces of string about 30” each.
  4. Tie each end of the strings through a hole in the bag. The goal is to create two loops.
  5. For the kite handle, cut another piece of string around 30”.
  6. Loop this new piece of string through the two loops you created and tie in a knot.
  7. Glue streamers to the bottom of the bag to make tails.
  8. Decorate the rest of the kite as desired.

Source(s): 100 Art Activities for Kids


Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Friday, August 22, 2014

August 22: Inventors’ Month

image from icfw.org

August is Inventors’ Month. Why not tap into the kids’ creativity and see what inventions they can develop by holding an invention convention?
Invention Convention

Materials:

  • Unlimited supply of recycled items
  • Variety of materials for attaching items (string, staples, glue, tape, etc.)
  • Paper
  • Pencil

Directions:

  1. The materials listed above are only a starting point. The adults and kids can be creative in coming up with plenty more materials to inspire inventions.
  2. Allow kids to work alone or in groups.
  3. Encourage children to look over materials and develop an idea first of what they wish to create. They can even draw out a diagram of what they want their finished product to look like.
  4. Once designed, then kids can start building.
  5. When products are complete, display the kids’ work by putting on an Invention Convention. Think of this as similar to a science fair.

Source(s): 100 Nature Activities for Kids card set.

Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Thursday, August 21, 2014

August 21: Veterinary Week

image from lipetplace.com

The fourth week of August is Veterinary Week. Why not let the kids create a prop box for a vet’s office? A prop box is a collection of toys, materials, and other supplies which allow children to use their imaginations to pretend around a certain theme.
Vet’s Office Prop Box

Materials:

  • Stuffed animals
  • Boxes for cages
  • Pet toys
  • Food and water dishes
  • Leashes
  • Medical kits
  • Plastic gloves
  • Strips of material (bandages)
  • Pamphlets on animal care
  • Books about animals
  • newspaper

Directions:

  1. The materials listed above are just a starting point. See what other ideas the kids might have.
  2. The boxes that hold 10 reams of computer paper are a nice size for prop boxes. They can be covered with contact paper to make them more attractive.

Source(s): 100 Drama Activities for Kids


Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

August 20: National Radio Day

image from marquettesocialscene.com

In celebration of Radio Day, try this activity which focuses on listening to songs on the radio.
Song Mix

Materials:

  • Radio
  • Paper
  • Pencil

Directions:

  1. Turn on the radio to a song and write down the first phrase you hear.
  2. Now change the station. Again, write down the first phrase from a song that you hear.
  3. Continue the process until you have half a dozen phrases or so.
  4. Read the phrases together to create a new song.
  5. Kids can mix and match the phrases and even try to sing it.

Source(s): Adapted from HowStuffWorks.com; featured in 100 Music Activities for Kids (activity D2)


Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

August 19: Aviation Day (Aviator Orville Wright’s birthday)

image from weirdasianews.com

Orville Wright was born today in 1871. He and his brother Wilbur invented the airplane, successfully launching the first flying machine on December 17, 1903. Here’s an airplane game you can play with kids.


Paper Airplane Tag

Materials:

  • Paper
  • Pattern book for making paper airplanes
  • Chalk for drawing circles

Directions:

  1. Make 2 or 3 circles with the chalk in an outdoor play area.
  2. An airplane thrower stands in each circle.
  3. Throwers may not leave circles.
  4. One child is the airplane receiver. She will return airplanes to the throwers.
  5. Other children move around in a designated play area.
  6. Airplane thrower tries to throw paper airplanes at children to “tag” them.
  7. If the airplane thrower hits someone, then that person takes the thrower’s place in the circle. The thrower can then become the new receiver.

Source(s): 100 Game Activities for Kids


Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Sunday, August 17, 2014

August 17: Archaeology Day

image from digkabri2011.wordpress.com

Kids can create and conduct their own archaeology digs with this activity.
Archaeology Dig in Plaster

Materials:

  • Assorted rock, shells, fossils, bones, etc.
  • Large foil pan
  • Plaster of Paris
  • Water
  • Tools for digging, such as metal forks
  • Safety goggles
  • Stiff brushes
  • Newspaper

Directions:

  1. Gather materials to be buried in the plaster.
  2. Trace each object on a piece of paper. This creates a map to go by when digging later.
  3. Place objects in large pan.
  4. Mix plaster of Paris and pour over the objects.
  5. With a large enough pan, you can create layers by letting one level dry before adding more objects and creating another layer.
  6. Once plaster is hardened, kids can go to work digging up the hidden treasures.
  7. Let kids use various tools for digging in the plaster.
  8. As objects are found, they can be placed on the map.

Source(s): Toolbox Training’s 100 Nature Activities for Kids card set.

Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Saturday, August 16, 2014

August 16: Tell a Joke Day

Obviously this could be a day to allow children to tell their favorite jokes. Consider getting some joke books from the library. However, you can also go a step further. Why not encourage kids to do short and silly skits?


Skits

Materials:

Resources for skits. Consider:

Directions:

  1. Explain to kids that skits are like mini-plays. Usually they are quick jokes that take a minute or two.
  2. Pick out skits to perform. What materials are needed?
  3. Who will this show be performed for? A small group? A large group?
  4. Where will this be performed? On a stage? At the front of a room? Be sure audience will be able to see and hear. Will kids have a microphone? Can they tape-record voices beforehand and then just act during the performance?
  5. Determine the order of the skits. Who will emcee? A child? The adult? Make sure emcee knows order.

Source(s): 100 Drama Activities for Kids


Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Friday, August 15, 2014

August 15: Relaxation Day

image from PeoplesIntegrativeMedicine.com

What activities can you do with the kids to promote relaxation? Consider:


Freeze and Feel

Materials:

  • None necessary unless for the signal

Directions:

  1. Decide on a signal (a bell, chime, hand clap, finger snap, gesture, turning off lights, etc.).
  2. When signal is given, children freeze where they are.
  3. Children are instructed to take a couple deep breaths and notice what they are feeling.
  4. Also notice what your body is doing. Are parts of your body clenched or tight? Relax them.
  5. Give children the signal again to bring the group back.
  6. Discuss what children felt.

Source(s): KidsRelaxation.com
Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Thursday, August 14, 2014

August 14: Financial Awareness Day

It may not seem like a very exciting day to celebrate (especially when today is also Creamsicle Day!) but consider ways in which you can involve the children in the financial side of your program. Before sharing any financial information with children, run it by your supervisor. Depending on the children’s ages, you can share information such as what the program budget is for supplies, toys, equipment, field trips, and resources. Is there a part of the budget which is discretionary enough that the kids can even make suggestions about how to spend the money?


Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

August 13: Left Hander’s Day

Yes, there is a special day for lefthanders. Approximately 10% of the population is left-handed. Check in your program. How many of the kids are left-handed? Is it about 10%?

Do you know (or they) know who the famous left-hander is pictured below?

President Barack Obama! Five of the last seven presidents have been left-handed. They are Gerald Ford, Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton, and Barack Obama.

Ask the kids if they can identify some other famous lefthanders. Check this site for more famous lefties.

You can also ask kids to try writing or drawing with their opposite hand today. How easy or difficult is it?


Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

August 12: The personal computer is introduced (1981).

image from Wikipedia.org

IBM introduced its personal computer. Just think how much the computer has changed in thirty years and what impact it has had on so many aspects of our culture. Play this game to show how much information we now get from the Internet and compare that to the information from newspapers.


Internet Match Game

Materials:

  • Old newspapers
  • Computer with Internet access

Directions:

  1. First and foremost, make sure you follow your program’s policies regarding the use of the computer and Internet. If you use the Internet, check settings to see if material will be screened for content.
  2. Provide kids with newspapers and ask them to find a story that interests them.
  3. The kids’ jobs are to then find a related story on the Internet.
  4. What details are included in both stories? Which story gets kids interest more? Which seems more factual? Are there any contradictory details in the stories?
  5. This game can teach kids some of the basics of researching a story in more than one place.

Source(s): Toolbox Training’s upcoming 100 Language Activities for Kids book.
Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Monday, August 11, 2014

August 11: Play in the Sand Day

image from kidzworld.com


Sand Painting

Materials:

  • Glue
  • Sand or coffee grounds
  • Paper
  • Cotton swabs

Directions:

  1. If not too windy, this is best done outside.
  2. Children use cotton swabs and glue to draw a design or picture on their paper.
  3. When finished, sprinkle sand or coffee grounds over pictures.
  4. Shake off any excess into a container so it may be used again.

Source(s): 100 Art Activities for Kids. Also consider activity H2 from 100 Construction Activities for Kids.


Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Sunday, August 10, 2014

August 10: Lazy Day

image from SisterEarthOrganics.com

Since today is Lazy Day, I figured why bother posting an activity? Well, okay, I didn’t go that far, but let’s consider what would happen if people didn’t do what was expected of them.


What if Everyone Was Lazy?

Materials:

  • Paper
  • Pencil
  • Card stock or thick paper
  • Markers, crayons, colored pencils
  • Other materials for card decorating

Directions:

  1. Ask the kids about all the different jobs that happen around them, specifically in your setting (school, child care center, etc.)
  2. Consider who it takes to keep your program itself operating – teachers, directors, principals, secretaries, support staff, etc.
  3. Consider the people it takes to keep your facility or building operating – custodians, cooks, building maintenance, lawn maintenance, electricians, plumbers, etc.
  4. Ask the kids to make lists of some of the specific jobs these people do. What would happen if they chose not to do their jobs one day? What if the custodian didn’t empty the trash or the cooks didn’t make lunch?
  5. Make cards for the different people who keep your program or facility going. Thank them for some of the specific jobs they do.

Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Saturday, August 9, 2014

August 9: Send an Email Greeting Day

image from bgsu.edu


Email Pen Pals

Materials:

  • Computer with Internet capability

Directions:

  1. Consider a twist on a familiar activity. If you are part of a child care program or school, have you been pen pals with another facility? Consider developing email pen pals between your organization and another one.
  2. If you have regular access to a computer, kids can help compose emails to send to the other program.
  3. You can even set up an email just for this project through a free service such as yahoo.com.
  4. Before launching this activity, let families know what you are doing and what precautions you are taking in case they have any nervousness about their children being online. If you intend to send any pictures of kids in your program, be sure you have parental permission.

Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Friday, August 8, 2014

August 8: Sneak Some Zucchini onto Your Neighbor’s Porch Day

image from biteofthebest.com

Betcha didn’t know there was a holiday called “Sneak Some Zucchini onto Your Neighbor’s Porch Day,” did you? It is for real – google it! Well, today is the day! Of course, this is also Senior Citizens Day. Why not combine them? Are there senior citizens in your neighborhood? Is there a nearby assisted living facility or nursing home? Why not start a new tradition?


Vegetable Baskets

Materials:

  • Baskets
  • Assorted vegetables

Directions:

  1. Let the kids assemble vegetable baskets.
  2. Include cards or notes that say something about your facility or organization.
  3. Something about the child or children who assembled that basket can also add a personal touch.
  4. You may or may not choose to mention that this is in celebration of “Sneak Some Zucchini onto Your Neighbor’s Porch Day”. It depends on whether or not you think people will believe you!

Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Thursday, August 7, 2014

August 7: Sea Serpent Day and Lighthouse Day

image from paintingsilove.com

With two sea-themed holidays, have the kids make sea scenes.


Seascapes

Materials:

  • tissue paper
  • white poster board or construction paper
  • glue
  • water
  • cups or bowl
  • brushes

Directions:

  1. Explain to children that a seascape is a painting of the ocean and its shoreline.
  2. Mix some glue with a little water in a small bowl or cup.
  3. Each child gets a piece of paper or poster board and some tissue paper.
  4. Tear tissue paper into strips.
  5. Brush some glue onto the board and place tissue paper over it one piece at a time.
  6. Brush more glue over tissue paper to make it lay flat.
  7. Arrange torn tissue paper so that some overlap.
  8. Leave white space between some pieces to suggest waves.
  9. After the seascape is dry, kids can also add items to the scene – such as sea serpents or lighthouses!

Source(s): 100 Art Activities for Kids.


Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Wednesday, August 6, 2014

August 6-12: Apple Week

image from ifood.tv


Caramel Apples

Materials:

  • 6 apples
  • 6 flat 4-inch long wooden sticks
  • Package of caramels, 14 ounces
  • Water
  • Microwave-safe bowl
  • Spoon
  • Wax paper
  • Candy

Directions:

  1. Insert sticks into bottom of apples.
  2. Unwrap caramels and add to bowl with water.
  3. Microwave until melted, stirring halfway through.
  4. Dip apples in caramel. Use a spoon to make sure all of apple is covered.
  5. Place on wax paper.
  6. You may also wish to decorate apples with candy or sprinkles.
  7. Refrigerate.
Source(s): familycorner.com, adapted for the Toolbox Training book 100 Cooking Activities for Kids (activity D3).


Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Tuesday, August 5, 2014

August 5: Neil Armstrong was born (1930).

image from 25.media.tumblr.com

Neil Armstrong was the first man to walk on the moon. In celebration, why not do some rocket flying?


Balloon Rockets

Materials:

  • sausage-shaped balloons
  • straws
  • tape
  • string (kite string or other thin twine; yarn does not work well)

Directions:

  1. Cut string about 10 feet long.
  2. Thread one end of the string through a straw.
  3. Pull string tight, taping each end down to different objects.
  4. Ideally, one side should be slightly higher than the other.
  5. Blow up balloon, but do not tie it. Make sure kids don’t put mouths on balloons if they are going to need someone else to blow up the balloon for them.
  6. Tape balloon so that it hangs under straw and so that the sausage shape of the balloon is parallel with the floor. The balloon and straw should start at the higher end of the string with the “nose” end of the balloon (opposite the mouth) pointing toward the lower part of the string.
  7. Let go of mouth of balloon and your rocket should shoot from one end of the string to the other.

Source(s): 100 Construction Activities for Kids (activity N1).


Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Monday, August 4, 2014

August 4: Twins Day

image from parentdish.com


Mirror Twins

Materials:

  • Stage area should ideally be a wide doorway which kids can walk across, but audience can sit in front of and see
  • No props necessary, but could be available (would need two of each prop)

Directions:

  1. There is a classic scene from a Marx brothers’ movie in which one character imitates another to make it appear the first character is seeing himself in a mirror. This is a great activity to get kids focused on the physicality of stage movement, as well as working on timing and just being silly.
  2. This is a great game to do with a larger group. Most youth will serve as audience members, but everyone can have turns on stage if kept short.
  3. Two performers are on the stage area. One is the “actor” and the other is the “mirror.” The actor’s job is to perform simple activities for the “mirror” to imitate.
  4. Remind kids that this works best when the actor moves at a reasonable pace. The slower the actor moves, the easier it is for the mirror to imitate.
  5. The best activities allow the “mirror” to do some guessing about what comes next. For example, if the actor performs something with a sequence (like getting up in the morning and get dressed), the “mirror” will have a better idea of what to expect. Also good are large motor activities (climbing a ladder, sports, etc.).

Source(s): 100 Drama Activities for Kids (activity G7)


Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Sunday, August 3, 2014

August 3: Columbus set sail on first voyage in 1492.

image from funfamilycrafts.com


Egg Cup Ships

Materials:

  • 3 cardboard egg cups
  • Brown acrylic craft paint
  • Paintbrush
  • ¼ cup modeling clay or play dough
  • 6 toothpicks
  • 1 sheet white paper
  • Scissors
  • White craft glue

Directions:

  1. Paint the egg cups inside and out with brown paint. Set aside to dry.
  2. Cut sails from white paper. You will need 6 large sails (1.5” x 1”) and 18 small sails (.5” x .75”).
  3. Set aside three of the toothpicks for the large sails. Break or cut the other three toothpicks in half, giving you 6 halves.
  4. Put a line of glue through the middle of one of the small sails. Place the cut or broken end of one of the toothpick halves onto the glue line.
  5. Roll it in the glue to cover both sides, then place another sail on top, sandwiching the two sails together. Flatten the sails together with your fingers and set aside to dry.
  6. Repeat step number 5 with each toothpick half and 2 small sails (each).
  7. Following the guide in step number 5, make the larger salls. For each large sail you will need a toothpick, 2 small sails and 2 large sails. Glue the small sail to the end of the full toothpick, and then glue the larger sail beneath it, leaving a small gap between the top and bottom sail. Set aside to dry.
  8. Roll a small amount of clay in your palm, enough to line the bottom of the egg cup. Place in the egg cup and flatten to cover bottom.
  9. Insert open end of large sail into the middle of the clay. Insert two small sails, one on either side of the large sail, into the clay.

Source(s): Kaboose.com
Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Saturday, August 2, 2014

August 2: First Lincoln penny issued (1909).

image from fineartamerica.com


Penny Washing

Materials:

  • dull pennies
  • water
  • white vinegar
  • salt
  • glass jar
  • measuring spoons
  • towels

Directions:

  1. Put salt on a penny.
  2. Put vinegar on another penny.
  3. Predict what will happen. Observe and discuss.
  4. Mix 6 tbs. vinegar and 2 tbs. salt in a jar. Stir in some pennies for a few minutes.
  5. Rinse pennies and dry with towel.
  6. Observe and discuss results.
  7. Explanation: The dull film on the pennies forms when oxygen atoms from the air join the copper atoms in the pennies. Vinegar and salt when mixed form an acid which breaks down the oxygen atoms to make pennies look new again.

Source(s): 100 Science Activities for Kids (activity D1).


Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

Friday, August 1, 2014

August 1: Sports Day


Rotation Baseball

Materials:

  • bat
  • baseball or tennis ball
  • bases

Directions:

  1. There are no teams. Instead everyone takes turns at every position.
  2. Rotation can vary, but a suggestion would be catcher, batter, first base, outfield, second base, outfield, shortstop, outfield, third base, outfield, pitcher. You can eliminate some positions with a smaller group of players.
  3. There should be at least three players “on deck.” This allows batters to stay on base once they’ve hit the ball. Other extra players can serve as outfielders or wait on the bench to be on deck.
  4. You may choose to give kids points (1 for a single, 2 for a double, 3 for a triple, or 4 for a home run).
  5. Unless you choose otherwise, regular rules of baseball apply.
  6. If kids complain about other children pitching, you might allow them to pick who they want to pitch.

Source(s): Toolbox Training’s book 100 Game Activities for Kids (activity C2)


Check out the full August calendar. It includes floating holidays, specialty weeks, and specialty months.

August Holidays and Activities

Listed below are interesting holidays, celebrations, important dates, and events for August. Icons indicate an activity from one of Toolbox Training’s 100 Activities series of books or activity card sets. Hover over the icon for specific references to exact activities.

You can also click on links for additional information on dates. Many of these connect directly to activities on the Toolbox Training blog, but some are off-site links.

1

National anthem composer Francis Scott Key's Birthday (1779)

Respect for Parents' Day

National Day Of Switzerland (founded 1291)

Sports Day

MTV debuted (1981)

Raspberry Cream Pie Day

2

Ice Cream Sandwich Day

Latin American Festival (2-4)

First Lincoln penny issued (1909)

3

Columbus set sail on first voyage (1492)

Park Day

4

Hooray for Kids Day!

Jazz singer Louis Armstrong was born (1901)

Twins Day

U.S. Coast Guard Day (established 1790)

5

Sisters' Day

Astronaut Neil Armstrong's Birthday (1930)

6

Root Beer Float Day

Wiggle Your Toes Day

Summer Halfway Day

Fresh Breath Day

Actress/comedienne Lucille Ball's Birthday (1911)

7

Lighthouse Day

Sea Serpent Day

8

Senior Citizens Day

Sneak Some Zucchini onto Your Neighbor's Porch Day

9

Popcorn Festival

Romance Day

Send An Email Greeting Day

Smokey the Bear's Birthday (1944)

Book Lovers' Day

Art Appreciation Day (International)

Dance A Polka Day

10

President Herbert Hoover's Birthday (1874)

First steam locomotive

Middle Children's Day

Lazy Day

S'mores Day

11

Play in the Sand Day

Son's and Daughter's Day

12

Youth Day (International)

Truck Driver Day

IBM Personal Computer introduced (1981)

13

Left Hander's Day

Blame Someone Else Day

Frontierswoman Annie Oakley's Birthday (1860)

Movie director Alfred Hitchcock’s Birthday (1899)

14

Financial Awareness Day

Assumption Day

Creamsicle Day

15

Relaxation Day

I Love Cowboys and Cowgirls Day

Angel Food Cake Day

16

Tell a Joke Day

Roller coaster patented (1898)

17

Hawaii Statehood Day

Frontiersman Davy Crockett's Birthday (1786)

Archaeology Day

Thriftshop Day

18

The Wizard of Oz movie premiered (1939)

Bad Poetry Day

19

President Bill Clinton's Birthday (1946)

Aviation Day/Aviator Orville Wright's Birthday (1871)

20

National Radio Day

Lemonade Day

Television patented (1930)

21

Basketball star Wilt Chamberlain's Birthday (1936)

22

Be an Angel Day

Tooth Fairy Day

23

Plumber's Day

Hug Day

Ride the Wind Day

Spongecake Day

First photograph of Earth from the Moon (taken by Lunar Orbiter, 1966)

24

Waffle iron patented (1869)

Peach Pie Day

25

Banana Split Day

Kiss And Make Up Day

26

Women's Equality Day (anniversary of women getting the vote, 1920)

Make Your Own Luck Day

Cherry Popsicle Day

27

Spiritual leader Mother Teresa's Birthday (1910)

Banana Lovers’ Day

Just Because Day

28

Martin Luther King Jr. gave his “I Have a Dream” speech (1963)

Sauntering Day

Race Your Mouse Day

29

First Scout Camp opened (1934)

More Herbs, Less Salt Day

30

Toasted Marshmallow Day

31

Trail Mix Day

Kinetopographic camera patented (1897)


Floating Holidays:

  • Picnic Day (1st Monday)
  • Mustard Day (1st Saturday)
  • American Family Day (1st Sunday)
  • Friendship Day (1st Sunday)
  • Worldwide Forgiveness Day (1st Sunday)
  • Homeless Animals Day (3rd Saturday)

Specialty Weeks:

1st week:
  • Clown Week
2nd week:
  • Apple Week (August 6-12)
  • Elvis Week
  • Simplify Your Life Week (August 5-11)
  • Smile Week 3rd week:
  • Air Conditioning Appreciation Week
  • American Dance Week
  • Aviation Week
  • Don't Wait – Celebrate! Week
  • Friendship Week (August 19-25)
  • Thanks for All the Gifts Week
  • Weird Contest Week 4th week:
  • Be Kind to Humankind Week
  • Stepparent's Appreciation Week
  • Veterinary Week
    Specialty Months:

    • Admit You're Happy Month
    • American Artist Appreciation Month
    • Back to School Month
    • Catfish Month
    • Children's Good Manners Month
    • Children's Vision & Learning Month
    • Family Fun Month
    • Foot Health Month
    • Golf Month
    • Home Business Month
    • Hug Month
    • Inventors' Month
    • Literacy Month
    • Parks Month
    • Peach Month
    • Romance Awareness Month
    • Water Quality Month
    • Watermelon Month

  • Check out other months or return to activity calendar page.